Game Details
Developer Square Enix
Publisher Square Enix
Available on PS5 · PS4 · Xbox Series X · Xbox One · Nintendo Switch · PC
Reviewed on Nintendo Switch
Release Date December 13, 2022

Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion finally released on all platforms a few days ago. I’ve been playing it leading up to release on Nintendo Switch through review code provided by Square Enix. I will also be reviewing the Xbox Series X version in the near future, but I wasn’t going to skip covering the game on Steam Deck which made me pre-order the game digitally to play it on every platform including PS5 through a physical release pre-order. I already covered my initial impressions of the Switch port here. For my Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion Nintendo Switch and Steam Deck review, I am going to highlight why this remaster that almost feels like a remake in some ways is worth your time on a portable system.

Like I mentioned in my preview, I never played Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII before, so this release was my first taste of the prequel to Final Fantasy VII. Having now played it not only on Switch, but also on PC and Xbox Series X, I’ve come away impressed with how much work has gone into making this release look and feel modern. Square Enix also didn’t change much of the structure, and that benefits both Nintendo Switch and Steam Deck with the bite-sized missions suiting portable play perfectly. It also helps that this release has gotten a very good Nintendo Switch port when it comes to portable play, and it also runs very well on Steam Deck out of the box.

Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion is perfect for portable play

I won’t get into the story details or why the combat feels very good even today in this feature because I will be covering all of that in my Xbox Series X review. What I will highlight, is how Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion’s structure complements the pickup and play nature of both the Nintendo Switch and Steam Deck. Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII was a PSP game, and Square Enix has given it a gorgeous coat of paint and tried to modernize it to feel right at home for those who played Final Fantasy VII Remake. It absolutely succeeds there and serves as a nice appetizer for the next Final Fantasy VII release.

Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion on Nintendo Switch

Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion in handheld mode, is an easy recommendation. It looks and runs well. The frame rate is half of current generation consoles, but it feels like a lot of effort went into making the Nintendo Switch version as good as it could be. This is complemented by HD Rumble that is a lovely addition. If you play docked under a TV, the results aren’t as nice. The lower resolution is very noticeable, and I would recommend getting Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion on another platform if you have access to one, and want to play on TV. The only downsides to playing it handheld are with the interface text size that might be too small for some, and the Joy-Cons not suiting action games like this. I ended up using my Hori Split Pad Pro to play on Nintendo Switch.

Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion on Steam Deck

As of this writing, Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion is not Steam Deck Verified by Valve. It likely will be though, because it runs very well on the platform. Out of the box, expect 800p and 60fps with drops. This is with the default Proton version used. I tested out the presets and tweaked some of the settings to end up with setting the game to 800p and 60fps. It is still 16:9 for gameplay and cut-scenes though. I turned the shadows and anti-aliasing to lower options and switched to Virtual Fullscreen in the display settings. I was happy with the results, and have enjoyed replaying the game on Steam Deck. One thing to note is that Steam Cloud for this game also syncs the game settings. When I went back to my laptop, the game booted up at 720p and 60fps instead of 1080p and 120fps that I used before. Overall, Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion is a joy to play on Steam Deck with a 60fps target if you’re ok with some drops. If you aren’t, I’d recommend locking it to 30fps or using the Steam Deck’s 40hz refresh rate option.

— Article Continues Below —

Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion Switch vs Steam Deck

Given the choice, I’d go Steam Deck for Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion right now. It isn’t a bad experience on Nintendo Switch, but it looks and runs a lot better on Steam Deck. I took care of my control issues by using the Hori Split Pad Pro, which might not be an option for you. Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion is another Square Enix release in 2022 that feels excellent on Steam Deck with minor issues. I hope these can be addressed in updates. If you would rather buy the game on Switch, you can rest assured that Square Enix didn’t release a mediocre conversion. It is worth getting if you play in handheld mode.

crisis core switch vs steam deck
Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion Switch vs Steam Deck

When I play remasters or remakes of games I never experienced originally, I usually regret not checking out the initial release. In this case, I’m glad I could experience the story and gameplay of Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII through Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion. This release only makes me wish we didn’t have to wait so long for Final Fantasy VII Rebirth. Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion is out now worldwide on all consoles and PC. Check it out on the eShop here and Steam here.